I think, therefore

The Thinker, Rodin. Public Domain

The Thinker, Rodin. Public Domain

When I first started to write, in my teens and early 20’s, I was hugely influenced by an eclectic group of American writers that included vocal social critics from the earliest years of the 20th century. People like Theodore Dreiser, who wrote famously clunky prose, but whose An American Tragedy (1925) was a stinging indictment of greed in our culture. Main Street (1920) by Sinclair Lewis depicted the soul-crushing conformity of a milieu we often imagine as small town innocence. But greater than any other influence was Henry Miller, who demonstrated the power of personal essays. His books, like The Air Conditioned Nightmare (1945) shaped my view of our dominant culture.

It was natural that this kind of critique, along with that of more recent writers and essayists like Michael Ventura, should influence  my blogging. But this spring something strange happened. At the start of Lent, though I do not celebrate the season in any formal way, I announced that I would “give up” negative posts for the duration. As expected, the experiment was more interesting than I expected.

"Rodin's thinker?" by Patricia van Casteren, 2006, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

“Rodin’s thinker?” by Patricia van Casteren, 2006, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

I’ve already blogged about some of my findings, especially the obvious ones, like the preponderance of bad news in all varieties of media. And I knew in advance there would be less to say if I excluded negative themes. What I didn’t expect was to find myself wondering whether it mattered – it’s virtuous to write about things like climate change and income inequality – isn’t it? A very interesting question since I don’t really believe many writers and artists change social ills directly. Maybe Charles Dickens did, or Jacob Riis, with his photos of child labor, but Dreiser didn’t eliminate greed and Miller didn’t break the ruts of conformity. Writers and artists sometimes change individual hearts and minds, but how does that work? That is not a rhetorical question, but something I often wonder about. How does it work?

Perhaps it was this kind of question that moved Phil Ochs, one of the best of the 60’s protests singers, to write, “You must protest, you must protest they say, it is your diamond duty / Ah, but in such an ugly world, the only true protest is beauty.” Maybe it’s what led Henry Miller, in his last years, to write books like, My Bike and Other Friends, and to focus on his watercolors.

Henry Miller paintings

My biggest discovery, while turning away from negative stories during Lent, concerned inner dialog rather than outer events. I’ve attended to this in a focused way in the past at various times, but not for a while. Mindfulness practice appeared on the cover of Time, so it must be gaining fad status, but that does not diminish its worth. It’s an ancient contemplative discipline that involves simply watching the contents of consciousness. Not fixing, fighting, or merging with, but simply observing what flits through awareness (here’s a good introduction to the practice).

I don’t know about anyone else, but I often find a subtle but persistent stream of critical inner narrative on self, others, and events. The narratives tend grow in the darkness yet dissolve when observed, the way shadows disappear when you turn on the light in a room. Observation eventually leads one to suspect that thoughts have no more substance than shadows, and no more inherent reality, and yet they can have profound effects. I suspect we have all had interesting synchronicities, met things in the world corresponding to our inner states. And if one subscribes at all to notions of the effect of collective thoughts, an idea given names like, “tipping point” or “hundredth monkey,” then the contents of consciousness take on a meaning beyond their effect on oneself alone.

I follow the Dalai Lama on Facebook and often note that when he is asked about topical issues like climate change, he always gives a thoughtful answer, the tone of which is invariably, “I am hopeful.” If I learned anything with this Lenten experiment, it is how hard it can be to cultivate a hopeful attitude. I also cannot imagine anything more important. Can there be a more important seed to plant than this one – “I am hopeful?”

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7 Responses to I think, therefore

  1. Selena says:

    It is said that just the act of observation changes things…to me that is very hopeful, to those who dream of a more positive influence.

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  2. calmgrove says:

    A few random thoughts sparked off by your own thoughts in this post:

    The Dalai Lama’s keyword in many of his FB posts is ‘compassion’, and I think this state of mind, as much as anything else, is one of the best bulwarks against negativity — believing it, practising it, modelling it. It’s often the only thing one can do in the face of events across the globe beyond one’s personal sphere of influence. And who knows what ripples are created by such a practice.

    The critical inner voice you refer to was called by the late great Susan Jeffers the Chatterbox–the constant monologue produced by your mind which can take on a personality of its own. I’m reminded of Smeagol’s chatterbox in one of the more successful aspects of Jackson’s LOTR film trilogy.

    Finally, writers like Dickens effecting social change: Charles Kingsley had a direct effect on public perceptions of ‘climbing boys’ who cleaned out chimney flues at great risk, so much so that the law banning such a practice was often referred to as The Water-Babies Act, after his novel. One small example, but an example nevertheless.

    Another fine post, Morgan.

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    • Thanks for reading and your thoughtful comments. Another practice the Dalai Lama mentions on various occasions is being thankful for one’s adversaries, as they teach us patience and help us to overcome anger. About all I can say after having tried that is, “baby steps…”

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      • calmgrove says:

        Yes indeed. Just awaiting judgement on a family member’s dispute over child access in a case involving domestic violence and abuse — hard to forgive the unrepentent.

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  3. Wonderful, thoughtful post and comments. Thanks for all the hope.

    Like

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